Tag Archive for Food

Stalking the Week: Waving the magical celery wand

Maybe it’s the wand-like shape of a celery stalk which suggests it is imbued with magical, “negative calorie” powers. Let’s just get this out of the way up front: it’s a myth that you burn more calories digesting celery than are actually in the celery itself. And nutritionally, it’s not really a big standout – there’s a reasonable amount of water and vitamin K in each stalk, but mostly it’s just a fiber delivery system.

But that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy this relative of carrots and parsley for its other merits, like the crunchy texture and clean, distinctive flavor. Those firm green ribs stand up great to all sorts of dips and schmears, making celery a perennial favorite on the veggie-and-dip tray at parties. But there are several other ways to enjoy it, especially in crunchy salads with fruit or other veggies.

The recipe that got this all started for me was a vegan creamy celery soup in the recent issue of Vegetarian Times. But that recipe isn’t yet posted on their site, and I’m not a big fan of copyright infringement, so I can’t share it with you here. I did manage to find a very similar recipe from Pamela Goes Primal, however, linked in the recipe list at the end of this post.

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Recipe ReDux: Stick with Maple Syrup – an easy, nutritious “French toast” recipe

The snow has receded, the sun has come out, and the temperatures are headed up (this week, insanely so). These few weeks in the very earliest part of New England’s spring are the time to forget any lingering bitterness about a dreary winter and tap into a natural source of sweetness.

Tapped sugar maples just around the corner from our house

The sunny sides of sugar maples yield a sap that when boiled down (in something like a 40-to-1 ratio) creates a fantastic amber treat: maple syrup. The process is explained nicely by the Boston Globe.

Photo by Clampants (aka Mr. Eating The Week) on flickr

To celebrate this seasonal bounty, we Recipe ReDuxers are “Sticking with Maple Syrup Sweetness” for our March theme. There are myriad ways to add this natural sweetness to meals, and I already had a simple breakfast recipe that mimics the flavors of French toast using maple syrup, cooked barley and a hard-boiled egg. But I decided to add in a few more healthy ingredients – banana and walnut – to really bring it up to Recipe ReDux standards. The result: banana walnut “French toast” barley:

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Rhode Scholar: Pullback week + cherry recovery smoothie recipe

Ahhhhh, pullback week: a couple easy 4-milers, some yoga & cross-training, a little ok, a whole bottle of wine, and an 8-mile long run. Granted, the long run was in the snow, but even that wasn’t too big of a deal (look carefully in my hair, though).

Snow? What snow?

The easiest part of this week, oddly enough, was the recovery from last week’s 14-miler. Honestly, I’ve never bounced back from a serious long run more quickly. Is my vegetarianism helping me recover? In No Meat Athlete’s post about his laid-back approach to veggie boosterism, Matt notes that some crazy endurance runners credit their vegetarian diets with shorter recovery times. Or maybe it’s my adherence to post-workout ice baths, even though I look forward to submerging my nether regions in freezing water about as much as I do shoving an ice pick into my forehead.

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Cauliflower Week: The wallflower steps out

For me, things like kale, sweet potatoes, Greek yogurt, spinach, nut butters, beans, and carrots are always top of mind. They get scribbled onto our grocery list week in and week out, and their absence in the fridge or pantry is immediately noticed. But on the other end of the spectrum is a food that rarely emerges from the recesses of my edible memory, one that when I stumble upon a recipe using it, I honestly think, “Oh, right, people eat that.”

Cauliflower doesn’t really deserve the wallflower treatment – inside those nubbly white florets are the nutrients common to the cruciferous vegetable family to which it belongs. Plants in this family are rich in sulphoraphanes (or in cauliflower’s case, precursor glucosinolates), which are associated with a lower risk of many cancers. But what finally snapped my neck in cauliflower’s direction was not the nutrition nerdery, but a simple roasted cauliflower soup:

Thick, earthy, and crunchy with the hazelnut topping, this soup from Sprouted Kitchen was all that. The mushroom-y flavor makes no sense (because there are none in there), but it is fantastic. The leftovers were nearly turned into a 10:00 am lunch, I was so eager to dive back in.

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Weekloaf – Bringing meat loaf into the 21st century

I had half a mind to hold this post until Halloween, given how scary meatloaf seems to be. On Teh Internets, there are countless “meatloaf-phobic” writers rehashing tales of weird/dry/awful meals in the past, shortly before imploring readers to “try this recipe, it’s not scary, I swear!”

BOO!

It’s understandable, given how far our collective culinary mindset has swung from the 1950s. Meatloaf is one of the poster children for the Formed Meats and Space Food era (see Gallery of Regrettable Food for more).

Luckily, there are many modern takes that have brought this simple classic up to date with healthier ingredients and novel flavors. Many recipes cut the traditional beef or replace it entirely with poultry to decrease the saturated fat. Packing a meatloaf with vegetables not only provides more veggie servings, it’s also key to keeping the loaf from getting dry. There are even vegetarian “meat” loaf recipes, including (surprise!) the one pictured above.

If you’re interested in a home-cooking classic fit for our modern age, I’m pretty sure these recipes will help anyone past their meatloaf apprehension:

  • Blue ribbon meatloaf from Eating Well (here)
  • Black rice curried meatloaf from Eating Well (here)
  • Asian style meatloaves from Cooking Light (here)
  • Magical meatloaf (vegan) from Squidoo/Vegan Lunchbox (here)Scroll down to the Magical Meatloaf recipe; that’s the one I made for this post.
  • Feta-stuffed turkey meatloaf with tzatziki from A Sweet Life (here)
  • Tuscan meatloaf with mushroom sauce from Simply Recipes (here)
  • Cheesy turkey meatloaf bites from Weelicious (here)

 

Recipe Redux: Straight to the heart – double chocolate ginger scones

In the month when we celebrate love, Recipe Redux is aiming straight for your heart with chocolate.

Chocolate has a taste that has launched a thousand obsessions. But the cocoa bean – and darker, less processed chocolates – also contains flavanoids that may act as antioxidants, help lower blood pressure, improve blood flow throughout the body, and prevent abnormal blood clotting. It’s no wonder that the culinary dietitians of Recipe Redux would focus on this heart-healthy, tastebud-friendly food for February (which is National Heart Month in the U.S.).

For my contribution, I figured one superfood is great, and two would be even better. So I combined heart-healthy chocolate from local Taza with the spicy-sweet anti-inflammatory root, ginger.

The result: a rich, zesty start to your morning with double chocolate ginger scones:

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The Week’s Week: what we’re eating at Chez Lynch

Long on time but short on ideas – that describes the situation here at Eating The Week. Usually it’s the reverse, and I’m scrambling to pick from 4 or 5 themes, winnow down a list of 20 recipes, and figure out which of many dishes to photograph. This week, however, tumbleweeds were blowing through my brain as I tried to figure out what on earth to talk about.

There is a food theme at the ready (clams), but it was back-burnered. I’d already written up and shopped for this week’s home-cooking menu, and wasn’t going to buy and cook a bunch of extraneous food just to feed the blog (long on time, yes, but not that long). But then a lightbulb replaced the tumbleweeds in my head: the random menu of food we’re eating at home could be this week’s theme.

Common nutrients? Couldn’t tell you (well, I could, but let’s pretend). Similar style of dish? Not really. Featured ingredient or kitchen tool used? Nope. The only thread holding this post together is that all these dishes are appearing on the table at Chez Lynch this week.

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The Week in Sports: Well, the week in salsa, anyway

There’s some sort of sporting thing going on this weekend, right? Big national cricket competition, or a curling match or something? If you’re reading the Internet Foodosphere, you can easily be excused for forgetting what the actual game is; here, the food rules the track and field. Potato skins, wings, chili, HUT! So let’s all don our lacrosse helmets and join the fray, with a week’s worth of salsa recipes with a twist.

Sweet potato salsa from Running to the Kitchen

Why not conventional salsa? It’s not for a lack of appreciation – I personally go through at least one 16-oz jar of salsa every week. I put it on quesadillas and eat it with chips, sure, but I also put it on salads, in sandwiches, and in my mouth directly from the jar (Tim still looks incredulous when he sees me do this). It’s mostly about taste, but my inner nutrition nerd also loves this stuff: salsa is an easy way to add to your veggie (and often fruit) intake for the day, with relatively few calories and a good hit of flavor.

Cucumber avocado salsa from Weelicious

But you don’t need me to give you recipes for that – it’s easy to grab some really tasty typical salsa from the store. Anything farther afield, however, is rarely in the ready-made aisle. So we’re going to have to sharpen our knives and roll up our sleeves to try some variations on the salsa theme. I don’t have any recipes of my own to share, despite my unabashed love of salsa paired with anything else edible. Thankfully, there are plenty of novel salsa recipes from other folks on Teh Internets, so here’s your week’s worth of the super scoopable stuff:

  • Feta salsa from Smitten Kitchen (here)
  • Black bean salsa with heirloom tomatoes and pear from Tonya Staab (here)
  • Mango strawberry salsa from Allrecipes (here)
  • Grilled peppery mushroom salsa from Epicurious (here)
  • Apple walnut salsa from Allrecipes (here)
  • Cucumber avocado salsa with mint from Weelicious (here)
  • Sweet potato blackberry salsa from Running to the Kitchen (here)

And let’s go team!

Fear Week: The mandoline lurks behind the shower curtain

In my kitchen the past week, I kept hearing the REEE REEE REEE from that classic Psycho shower scene. Has Tim’s patience with my switch to vegetarianism waned to the point of drastic retaliation? No, but he is the indirect source of my terror – for my birthday, he (and Miles, but mostly Tim) got me a mandoline slicer.

It seems a little silly – a sleek, efficient, and versatile tool should inspire pragmatic appreciation. Would I have a panic attack at the sight of a VW? No. But then, a VW doesn’t have a gaping, razor-edged maw perfectly positioned to nip a finger in a very serious way.

If I was going to make any use of this gift, I’d just have to get comfortable with danger. Life is full of precedents for this, such as graduating from “never ever touch the electrical socket” as a toddler to “wantonly plugging 18 strands of holiday lights into a single outlet” as an adult. So I put on my big-kid pants and gave this bad boy a whirl. First order of business: baked potato chips.

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Recipe Redux: Eggs BeneMex for a fresh start with breakfast

Fresh off our holiday trip to Texas, I was charged with devising a “fresh start” breakfast recipe for January’s Recipe Redux. Hopelessly Tex-Mex obsessed at that point, and looking for any excuse to douse things in salsa, I trained my sight on eggs Benedict. This was a perfect candidate for a healthifying Redux, what with the sticks of butter involved in the traditional sauce and noticeable absence of anything recently derived from a plant.

But simply omitting the hollandaise and adding salsa doesn’t maintain the creamy, sloppy texture that is a good part of what makes eggs Benedict awesome. Enter the magic ingredient: avocado.

By mixing up these mean, green nutrient machines with some lime and hot sauce, I got a spicy sweet sauce with that desired creamy texture, minus all the saturated fat. Combining the sauce with salsa over poached eggs and corn biscuits, I ended up with Eggs BeneMex, a great Tex-Mex take on the traditional breakfast dish.

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